Premier: Sarawak a rising tiger in renewable energy

June 16, 2022

Dateline 2022-05-09, Malay Mail:

Sarawak Premier Tan Sri Abang Johari Openg has described the state as a rising tiger in the renewable energy arena and is opening its frontiers to help traditional industries become more sustainable.

With hydrogen being one of the sectors that it intended to develop, he said the State Government had specifically highlighted renewable energy as a cornerstone to it

..


Malaysia’s biodiesel group opposes reduction of biofuel mandate

May 21, 2022

Dateline 2022-04-26, Reuters:

Malaysia should not cut its biodiesel mandate as it would lead to a crash in crude palm oil prices, a biodiesel producer group said on Tuesday, after Indonesia’s export ban on the edible oil spurred concerns over its use in fuel versus food.

The Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB), an industry regulator, told Reuters on Monday countries should slow the use of the edible oil as biofuel to ensure adequate supply for use in food, warning of a supply crisis following Indonesia’s ban.


23 Tcf of gas resources require CCS in Malaysia

May 11, 2022

Dateline 2022-04-14, Upstream Online:

National oil company Petronas has identified more than 46 trillion cubic feet of potential storage in depleted gas reservoirs offshore Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak that could be used to sequester carbon dioxide produced from about 23 trillion cubic feet of Malaysian gas resources that have yet to be developed.

Petronas’ upstream activities are forecast to require some 60% of the carbon capture and would be available as early as 2028,” says Wan Atikahsari Wan Zakaria, senior manager, Sarawak resource development and management at Petronas.


Malaysia Targets 40 Percent Renewable Energy By 2035

May 8, 2022

Guess this will be after the next 4 pandemics. Probably need more energy storage solutions.

Dateline 2022-04-1, Lowyat.net:

Renewable energy is all the rage these days, and for good reason. The good news is, it looks like Malaysia is taking steps to rely more on them. The government is looking to increase green energy generation to 40% of the country’s energy supply by 2035.

Energy and Natural Resources minister Takiyuddin Hassan said that the ministry has set targets for renewable energy contribution for the country in its energy transition plan. The first is the aforementioned 40% green energy supply by 2035. He says that the “installed capacity for renewable energy in Malaysia so far is 8700MW, while y 2035 the capacity is projected to double to 18000MW”.


Malaysia Targets 40 Percent Renewable Energy By 2035

May 7, 2022

Dateline 2022-04-01, Lowyat.net:

Renewable energy is all the rage these days, and for good reason. The good news is, it looks like Malaysia is taking steps to rely more on them. The government is looking to increase green energy generation to 40% of the country’s energy supply by 2035.

Energy and Natural Resources minister Takiyuddin Hassan said that the ministry has set targets for renewable energy contribution for the country in its energy transition plan. The first is the aforementioned 40% green energy supply by 2035. He says that the “installed capacity for renewable energy in Malaysia so far is 8700MW, while y 2035 the capacity is projected to double to 18000MW”.


Malaysia not exporting renewable energy, says Takiyuddin

May 6, 2022

Why is this a thing?

Dateline 2022-03-31, The Edge:

The government does not export the renewable energy it produces, but instead uses it to attract more investors to the country, said Energy and Natural Resources Minister Datuk Seri Takiyuddin Hassan.

He said renewable energy was a top choice of a majority of foreign investors, especially those who chose to apply green technology in their industrial operations or investments.


Renewable energy contributes to a competent, credible local energy industry — Takiyuddin

May 3, 2022

Dateline 2022-03-26, The Edge:

The role of sustainable energy development, especially Renewable Energy (RE) in the energy transition agenda, contributes to a competent and credible local energy industry, said Energy and Natural Resources Minister Datuk Seri Takiyuddin Hassan.

He said the contribution of RE in supporting the country’s climate change aspirations was also evident when the rate of electricity generation capacity from RE sources increased from 5% in 2001 to 24% in 2021.


Indonesia, Malaysia commit to biodiesel mandates despite higher prices

April 30, 2022

Dateline 2022-03-24, Reuters:

Top palm oil producers Indonesia and Malaysia remain committed to their mandatory biodiesel programmes despite higher prices of the feedstock to reach green energy goals, senior officials said on Thursday.

Indonesia and Malaysia use palm oil as blending for biodiesel, with Indonesia since early 2020 using a mandatory B30 – a biodiesel containing 30% of palm-based fuel – the highest mandatory mix in the world, to slash imports of diesel fuel.

Indonesia’s palm-based fuel programme “will not stop at B30”, Coordinating Minister for Economic Affair Airlangga Hartarto, told a virtual industry conference.


AG’s Report 2020: Good management of renewable energy development programme

April 25, 2022

Dateline 2022-04-17, The Edge:

The management of the renewable energy (RE) development programme is good in terms of achieving the installed capacity of RE as set out in the Green Technology Master Plan 2017-2030.

In addition, according to the Auditor-General’s Report (LKAN) 2020 Series 1, the contribution of RE in the national energy generation mix is good based on achievements of generation against the targets set out in the National Renewable Energy Policy and Action Plan.

However, there are weaknesses in aspects of programme management that need attention, including in the aspects of the notification system for RE producers, the feed-in tariff (FiT) programme performance and a significant shortage of feedstock supply of wood chips.


More fuel subsidies will defeat green goal, say economists 

April 23, 2022

Dateline 2022-04-17, The Malaysian Insight:

RISING fuel prices is tempting Putrajaya to increase fuel subsidies, but this is counterproductive to Malaysia’s goal of having net zero carbon emissions by 2050, economists say.

The best way is to give the subsidies in a targeted manner, with focus on the B40 lower income group and the M40 group.