(revised) IEM Shout Out – Talk, Lessons learnt from Past Process Safety Incidents

October 6, 2015

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a pre-AGM talk on Saturday, 10rd October, 2015, presented by Mohd Rizal Mohd Tajuddin.

The talk is intended to provide an appreciation of past process safety incidents, identify the common underlying causes amongst the famous past process safety incidents, the lessons that have and can further be learnt, barriers that have hindered opportunities to prevent repeat events and suggested enablers to incorporate lessons into the heart of engineering.

As for the speaker:

Mohd Rizal Mohd Tajuddin is a Technical Safety Engineer with almost fifteen (15+) years of working experience, in both engineering and operations. He has worked on diverse projects in chemical industries, petrochemical industries, water treatment facilities, onshore and offshore facilities locally and internationally. He was trained as a Technical Safety cum Process Safety Engineer with PLC International, Worley Parsons, PETROFAC and PETRONAS. He was the Technical Safety Specialist of Upstream HSE, PETRONAS. He has been working with various projects starting from conceptual stage until handover and follow on to Operation and Maintenance phases with various Oil and Gas Operators BP, ExxonMobil, PETRONAS, SHELL, ConocoPhillips and Woodside. He has been seconded to various project offices including overseas assignment to Jakarta, Indonesia as well as Perth, Australia for ConocoPhillips and Woodside projects. His expertise include engineering safety, risk assessment and management, asset integrity and reliability.

You can register for the talk here. Also register for the AGM, please.


IEM Shout Out – Talk, Lessons learnt from Past Process Safety Incidents

October 2, 2015

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a pre-AGM talk on Saturday, 3rd October, 2015, presented by Mohd Rizal Mohd Tajuddin.

The talk is intended to provide an appreciation of past process safety incidents, identify the common underlying causes amongst the famous past process safety incidents, the lessons that have and can further be learnt, barriers that have hindered opportunities to prevent repeat events and suggested enablers to incorporate lessons into the heart of engineering.

As for the speaker:

Mohd Rizal Mohd Tajuddin is a Technical Safety Engineer with almost fifteen (15+) years of working experience, in both engineering and operations. He has worked on diverse projects in chemical industries, petrochemical industries, water treatment facilities, onshore and offshore facilities locally and internationally. He was trained as a Technical Safety cum Process Safety Engineer with PLC International, Worley Parsons, PETROFAC and PETRONAS. He was the Technical Safety Specialist of Upstream HSE, PETRONAS. He has been working with various projects starting from conceptual stage until handover and follow on to Operation and Maintenance phases with various Oil and Gas Operators BP, ExxonMobil, PETRONAS, SHELL, ConocoPhillips and Woodside. He has been seconded to various project offices including overseas assignment to Jakarta, Indonesia as well as Perth, Australia for ConocoPhillips and Woodside projects. His expertise include engineering safety, risk assessment and management, asset integrity and reliability.

You can register for the talk here. Also register for the AGM, please.


IEM Shout Out – Talk, Lessons learnt from Past Process Safety Incidents

September 29, 2015

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a pre-AGM talk on Saturday, 3rd October, 2015, presented by Mohd Rizal Mohd Tajuddin.

The talk is intended to provide an appreciation of past process safety incidents, identify the common underlying causes amongst the famous past process safety incidents, the lessons that have and can further be learnt, barriers that have hindered opportunities to prevent repeat events and suggested enablers to incorporate lessons into the heart of engineering.

As for the speaker:

Mohd Rizal Mohd Tajuddin is a Technical Safety Engineer with almost fifteen (15+) years of working experience, in both engineering and operations. He has worked on diverse projects in chemical industries, petrochemical industries, water treatment facilities, onshore and offshore facilities locally and internationally. He was trained as a Technical Safety cum Process Safety Engineer with PLC International, Worley Parsons, PETROFAC and PETRONAS. He was the Technical Safety Specialist of Upstream HSE, PETRONAS. He has been working with various projects starting from conceptual stage until handover and follow on to Operation and Maintenance phases with various Oil and Gas Operators BP, ExxonMobil, PETRONAS, SHELL, ConocoPhillips and Woodside. He has been seconded to various project offices including overseas assignment to Jakarta, Indonesia as well as Perth, Australia for ConocoPhillips and Woodside projects. His expertise include engineering safety, risk assessment and management, asset integrity and reliability.

You can register for the talk here. Also register for the AGM, please.


IEM Shout Out – Conversion of Organic Wastes and Unused Biomass to Valuable Materials and Energy Using Sub-Critical Water

April 29, 2015

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a talk on Wed afternoon, 6th May, 2015, by Dr. Hiroyuki Yoshida .

Dr. Hiroyuki Yoshida obtained B. Eng. Degree in 1969 and Dr. Eng. in 1977 in Chemical Engineering from Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. He worked for this University from 1974 to 2013. He became a professor in 1995. From 2013, he has been working for Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UPM as a contract professor.

Sub-Critical water is high temperature and high pressure water but lower than those of critical points (647 K, 22.1 MPa). It shows three typical characteristics. Firstly, sub-critical water (sub-CW) has a great hydrolysis power at around 520 K and organic solids quickly decompose into low-molecular-weight valuable materials. Secondly, sub-CW works as a strong solvent and can extract oil almost perfectly at once. Thirdly, when the temperature is higher than about 600 K, hydrolysis power becomes small and pyrolysis power becomes great. The pyrolysis reaction can convert organics to liquid oil (alternative heavy crude oil) and/or solid char.

You can register here, and download the brochure here.


IEM Shout Out – Conversion of Organic Wastes and Unused Biomass to Valuable Materials and Energy Using Sub-Critical Water

April 22, 2015

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a talk on Wed afternoon, 6th May, 2015, by Dr. Hiroyuki Yoshida .

Dr. Hiroyuki Yoshida obtained B. Eng. Degree in 1969 and Dr. Eng. in 1977 in Chemical Engineering from Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. He worked for this University from 1974 to 2013. He became a professor in 1995. From 2013, he has been working for Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UPM as a contract professor.

Sub-Critical water is high temperature and high pressure water but lower than those of critical points (647 K, 22.1 MPa). It shows three typical characteristics. Firstly, sub-critical water (sub-CW) has a great hydrolysis power at around 520 K and organic solids quickly decompose into low-molecular-weight valuable materials. Secondly, sub-CW works as a strong solvent and can extract oil almost perfectly at once. Thirdly, when the temperature is higher than about 600 K, hydrolysis power becomes small and pyrolysis power becomes great. The pyrolysis reaction can convert organics to liquid oil (alternative heavy crude oil) and/or solid char.

You can register here, and download the brochure here.


IEM Shout Out – Talk On Integrated Waste Recovery and Regeneration System (REGEN System) in Palm Oil Mill

December 9, 2014

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be an afternoon talk on Friday, 12th Dec, 2014 by Dr. Denny K. S. Ng and Dr. David L. K. Lim.

As pointed out by National Biomass Strategy 2020, Malaysia had 83 million dry tonnes of palm-based biomass in 2012 with an estimated value of RM 24.9 billion. This is expected to increase to approximately 100 million dry tonnes by 2020.  Besides, palm oil mill effluent (POME) is also expected to increase to 100 million tonnes by 2020.  Based on the huge amount of palm-based biomass and POME available, there is a huge potential to recover and regenerate those biomasses into value-added products. To fully recover the biomasses, an integrated waste recovery and regeneration system (REGEN System) in palm oil mill is developed.  In this talk, an overview of REGEN system is presented. Besides, applications of REGEN system in palm oil mill are also discussed.

As for the speakers:

Dr. Denny K. S. Ng is the Founding Director of Centre of Sustainable Palm Oil Research and Associate Professor at the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus.  He is also the Manager of Professional Training at the Centre of Excellence for Green Technologies and Research Theme Associate of Crops for the Future Research Centre (CFFRC). His areas of specialisation include energy management, resource conservation via process integration techniques (pinch analysis and mathematical optimisation), synthesis and analysis of biomass processing and integrated bio refineries, as well as energy planning for greenhouse gas emission reduction.

Dr. David L. K. Lim is the Managing Director of Eureka Synergy Sdn. Bhd. Besides, he is also Executive Director of Havys Oil Mill Sdn. Bhd., Green Plant Organic Fertilizer Sdn. Bhd., etc. Dr. David Lim received his PhD in rotor-dynamic engineering from Staffordshire University, UK in 1994.  He has more than 15 years of hand-on experience in palm oil industry including designing of palm oil mill, development of biomass processing technologies, etc.

You can register here, and download the form here.


IEM Shout Out – Talk on Green Energy Potential in the Palm Oil Industry

September 29, 2012

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a talk on Saturday, 6th October, 2011.

The Palm Oil industry in Malaysia had attracted much negative publicity mostly from European NGOs on the issue of sustainability. As part of the measure to mitigate this issue, the Malaysian Government is encouraging the Palm Oil industry to reduce its carbon footprint.

Therefore all Mills in Malaysia are encouraged to convert the palm oil mill effluent into biogas by 2020. Conventional biogas technology had been around for more than 20 years but with the world’s energy prices going higher and with the Malaysian Government’s Feed-in-Tariff (FiT) program, there is a need to develop higher efficiency Biogas system.

Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors is a fairly new development around the world and recently these anaerobic membrane bioreactors (An-MBR) had been used for the first time in the world for treating palm oil wastewater. As a result, more difficult processes such as thermophilic digestion with An-MBR system can become a reality and it had resulted in superior biogas yield. Through the latest technology, the green energy from the Mill can be harvested and potentially converted into other form of fuel.

As for the speaker:

Mr. B. P. Chow is a Chemical Engineering graduate from the University of Birmingham. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) as well as a Chartered Engineer. Presently he is the Deputy Chairman of IChemE Malaysia and the Managing Director of Aquakimia Sdn. Bhd. He had more than 34 years of working experience primarily in the Palm Oil, Water & Wastewater business. He had been instrumental in bringing the Kubota Membrane Bioreactor technology from Japan to use local engineering to adapt it for the Palm Oil Industry

Water pinch sounds interesting. Please come along, and partake of the food (both intellectual and physical).

Register here or download the form here. A map to Wisma IEM is presented here.


IEM Shout Out – Talk on Green Energy Potential in the Palm Oil Industry

September 15, 2012

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a talk on Saturday, 6th October, 2011.

The Palm Oil industry in Malaysia had attracted much negative publicity mostly from European NGOs on the issue of sustainability. As part of the measure to mitigate this issue, the Malaysian Government is encouraging the Palm Oil industry to reduce its carbon footprint.

Therefore all Mills in Malaysia are encouraged to convert the palm oil mill effluent into biogas by 2020. Conventional biogas technology had been around for more than 20 years but with the world’s energy prices going higher and with the Malaysian Government’s Feed-in-Tariff (FiT) program, there is a need to develop higher efficiency Biogas system.

Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors is a fairly new development around the world and recently these anaerobic membrane bioreactors (An-MBR) had been used for the first time in the world for treating palm oil wastewater. As a result, more difficult processes such as thermophilic digestion with An-MBR system can become a reality and it had resulted in superior biogas yield. Through the latest technology, the green energy from the Mill can be harvested and potentially converted into other form of fuel.

As for the speaker:

Mr. B. P. Chow is a Chemical Engineering graduate from the University of Birmingham. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) as well as a Chartered Engineer. Presently he is the Deputy Chairman of IChemE Malaysia and the Managing Director of Aquakimia Sdn. Bhd. He had more than 34 years of working experience primarily in the Palm Oil, Water & Wastewater business. He had been instrumental in bringing the Kubota Membrane Bioreactor technology from Japan to use local engineering to adapt it for the Palm Oil Industry

Water pinch sounds interesting. Please come along, and partake of the food (both intellectual and physical).

Register here or download the form here. A map to Wisma IEM is presented here.


IEM Shout Out – Water Recovery Network for a Process Plant

September 16, 2009

This is a shout out for the IEM. The Chemical Engineering Technical Division (know as CETD to friends) will be having a half-day workshop on Saturday, 3rd October, 2009.

Industrial water recovery is commonly accepted as a promising mean to the water scarcity problem faced by the world-wide community. However, many regard that water recovery can only be achieved by the installation of purification units (e.g. filter) at the effluent discharge point of the wastewater treatment tank. This is indeed not true, as there are always direct reuse and recycle opportunities to be explored prior to the use of purification units, provided that appropriate mixing and segregation rules are followed.
Water pinch analysis technique has been widely accepted as a systematic design tool in synthesizing a water recovery network for maximum efficiency. It establishes the minimum fresh water and wastewater flowrates needed for a process plant after maximizing the reuse/recycle potential of its water sources, base on first principle (termed as targeting). After the water flowrate targets are established, some design rules are used to synthesize a network that achieves maximum water recovery.

As for the speaker:

Engr. Dr Dominic Foo is an Associate Professor with the University of Nottingham,  Malaysia Campus. Engr Dr Foo is a world leading researcher for waste minimisation,
focusing on the systematic design of water recovery systems. He published more than 40 journal papers and made more than 100 presentations in various conferences. He is a book editor on the design and optimisation techniques for sustainable processes. Engr Dr Foo conducts training for practicing engineers in the area of waste minimisation and process simulation.

Water pinch sounds interesting. Please come along, and partake of the food (both intellectual and physical).


RSCE-SOMChe08 – Poyry Poster Photos

December 8, 2008

The title says it all. Hui Hin has some more photos in her blog entry.